Charleston Extras: 8pm

Come dance with Fleur and Gianfranco to expand on your Charleston vocabulary with a continuing focus on connection and rhythm.

While the dance probably came from the challenge dances that were all part of the African-American dance called Juba, the particular sequence of steps which appeared in Runnin’ Wild were probably newly devised for popular appeal. “At first, the step started off with a simple twisting of the feet, to rhythm in a lazy sort of way. [This could well be the Jay-Bird.] When the dance hit Harlem, a new version was added. It became a fast kicking step, kicking the feet, both forward and backward and later done with a tap.” Further changes were undoubtedly made before the dance was put on stage. In the words of Harold Courlander, while the Charleston had some characteristics of traditional Negro dance, it “was a synthetic creation, a newly-devised conglomerate tailored for wide spread popular appeal.” Although the step known as “Jay-Bird”, and other specific movement sequences are of Afro-American origin, no record of the Charleston being performed on the plantation has been discovered.

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