Charleston Foundations: 7pm

Come dance with Ed and Alyssa to learn and practice the foundations of the Charleston. The focus of this class will be connection with emphasis leading and following in this eight count pattern dance.

While the dance probably came from the challenge dances that were all part of the African-American dance called Juba, the particular sequence of steps which appeared in Runnin’ Wild were probably newly devised for popular appeal. “At first, the step started off with a simple twisting of the feet, to rhythm in a lazy sort of way. [This could well be the Jay-Bird.] When the dance hit Harlem, a new version was added. It became a fast kicking step, kicking the feet, both forward and backward and later done with a tap.” Further changes were undoubtedly made before the dance was put on stage. In the words of Harold Courlander, while the Charleston had some characteristics of traditional Negro dance, it “was a synthetic creation, a newly-devised conglomerate tailored for wide spread popular appeal.” Although the step known as “Jay-Bird”, and other specific movement sequences are of Afro-American origin, no record of the Charleston being performed on the plantation has been discovered.

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